Google Affiliate Slap: You Can Bounce Back

I’m not sure I’ve read any reports of sites being able to bounce back from the Google Affiliate Slap, but I’m happy to report that we’ve conducted a successful test. (On accident of course)

In helping my son get started with some Internet marketing, he loaded a site that had initially held a #3-#5 organic position on Google with affiliate offers. The site was soon completely dropped from the Google index. My son removed the affiliate offers and we started the clock ticking to see if and when the site might show back up in Google’s index. I’m happy to report it took less than two weeks for it to bounce back from the Google Affiliate Slap and show up in the top 10 organic results.

Prior to my son adding additional affiliate offers, he had a few running on the site which had no negative affect on the organic SERPs. My bet is that Google has a formula that measures affiliate offers to the amount of content on a given page or the site in general. I’d be interested in hearing from others that have had an opportunity to test site recovery after getting hit by the Google Affiliate Slap.

Share your test results with our readers.

What’s Up With CPA Offers | Part 2

In my previous post “What’s Up With CPA Offers” I raised the question of possible fraud on the part of the affiliate offer provider. After all, it’s a known fact in the industry that companies that provide affiliate offers will instinctively try to figure out how an affiliate is getting traffic and then take measures to cut the affiliate out all together. This is especially true with affiliates that use Google Adwords, Yahoo, and MSN PPC, and is why it is important to cloak affiliate URLs.

Today has shown an interesting turn of events as I emailed one of the CPA networks this week and brought up the potential issue of some type of affiliate fraud. AMAZINGLY today,  two campaigns that were at 15% and 5% conversions yesterday have jumped to 28% and 37% conversion rates. The later had never gone over 10% a conversion rate and never more than one conversion in a day. Today this offer is at 3 conversions at over $30 each and still a long day ahead.

Is it possible that CPA networks have the ability to skim traffic or throttle conversions? While it has only been one day, the timing of my email certainly raises suspicions. So the question now becomes, why would CPA networks throttle or control the number of conversions? Can a CPA network divert or skim some extra cash by essentially taking traffic from affiliates?

How may affiliate marketers or folks doing CPA offers have seen a similar trend in their numbers?

Look for more results to come